News

End Of Fashion’s Justin Burford slams triple j: “They ended our career”

End of Fashion frontman Justin Burford has weighed in on the recent debate about triple j’s influence on Australian bands, claiming that the youth broadcaster “ended the career path” of his former band.

In a lengthy post published on his Facebook page, Burford detailed the demise of End Of Fashion, the Perth-based band he formed after partying ways with The Sleepy Jackson in 2004. His band were initially well supported by the station following the release of their self-titled, debut album, with lead single ‘O Yeah’ receiving enough airplay to secure the #8 spot on the Hottest 100 in 2005. However, he claims End of Fashion were “dropped like a sack of potatoes” by the station when they released their 2008 follow-up Book of Lies.

“Our lead single, ‘Fussy’ was even openly derided on air by Richard Kingsmill as ‘just another pop release’,” he says, “Apparently this was before pop was declared no longer a dirty word on the j’s. This, I might add was the ONLY time that song was ever played on this station”.

He says matters only got worse when the band released their third album Holiday Trip Of A Lifetime independently. “The single ‘Sleepaway’ was played once on Goodnights. Once. An album that took us a year to write and all the money we had culminated in that one spin, with the added derision of Mariani [Linda Marigliano] asking her listeners to tell her if this band was ‘relevant’ any more.”

In a follow-up comment to his original post, Burford admits that his band hoped that by “going independent” (they were previously signed to EMI) they would be able to secure more airplay on triple j. However, by that stage, he claims End of Fashion were effectively blacklisted: ”[Music director Richard] Kingsmill once said to our ex-management upon inquiring about the lack of play, Once we move on from an act, we never go back…’.”

Burford’s comments come in response to an article published on Fairfax in January, which claimed musicians were altering their sound to fit the station’s format. The piece triggered mixed reactions from many corners of the music industry, including Melbourne-based musician Whitley (aka Lawrence Greenwood) who also took to Facebook to criticise triple j for its “narrow-minded playlist”.

With Jay and The Doctor in happier times…

Justin Burford’s full triple j rant:

Without mincing words, and I will probably get a load of shit for saying this BUT, with many more music industry parties finally coming out and saying their piece about Triple J, I feel comfortable enough to say; Triple J ended the career path of End Of Fashion, no question. A band that was fully supported by the station, earning a top ten place in a Hottest 100, was dropped like a sack of hot potatoes upon the second album’s release. Our lead single, Fussy was even openly derided on air by Richard Kingsmill as “just another pop release.” Apparently this was before pop was declared no longer a dirty word on the j’s. This, I might add was the ONLY time that song was ever played on this station.

OK, so maybe it was cos we were signed to a major label. Nope. Our little known third album, Holiday Trip Of A Lifetime was completely independently produced and released, all on our own dime and time. The single ‘Sleepaway’ was played once on Goodnights. Once. An album that took us a year to write and all the money we had culminated in that one spin, with the added derision of Mariani asking her listeners to tell her if this band was “relevant” any more. I know a lot of ppl will say, at least you had what a lot of other bands never had and I agree. But upon that support we gave our whole lives over to making this band work only to have it taken away unceremoniously when they deemed it so. No J play? No career. And for people that ask me often… THAT is why End Of Fashion are no more. Rant over :)